Honoring Health — Suicide Prevention Resources for Native Populations — August 2018

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsletters/aian-newsletter/2018/aian-newsletter-august-2018

*/ /*--> */ /*--> */ /*--> */ September Is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death for all Americans and the 2nd leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 10 and 34. Native communities bear the largest burden of suicide among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, with Native youth being disproportionately affected. In parallel with National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month each September, Hope for Life Day provides the opportunity to increase awareness and spotlight current efforts toward Native suicide prevention. This issue features information that individuals and communities can

NIAMS Hosts Second Annual D.C. Lupus Consortium Meeting

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/announcements/niams-hosts-second-annual-dc-lupus-consortium-meeting

The lupus clinical research team at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) hosted its second annual D.C. Lupus Consortium (DCLC) meeting on October 27 th , 2017. They welcomed over 30 participants, including lupus researchers and advocates from the Washington, D.C. area to the NIH Clinical Center. The consortium aims to foster collaborations among lupus researchers in the NIH Intramural Research Program and partners in the regional academic, private practice and patient advocacy communities. Robert Carter, M.D., deputy director at NIAMS, kicked off the meeting by stating the importance of the DCLC’s inclusive and collaborative

NIAMS Update — July 26, 2018

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsletters/niams-update/2018/niams-update-july-26-2018

*/ /*--> */ /*--> */ /*--> */ SPOTLIGHT Letter From Dr. Stephen I. Katz: Working With the NIH Community To Foster Interdisciplinary Research Dear Colleagues, Collaboration across disciplines can inspire scientists to consider problems from new perspectives and yield creative new approaches to solving them. To this end, the NIAMS engages partners across the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the researchers we fund, to encourage and support interdisciplinary research. In addition, we often hear from the community about the importance of opportunities to work with researchers in other fields. For example, during listening sessions for the evaluation of our

Working With the NIH Community To Foster Interdisciplinary Research

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/about-the-director/letter/working-nih-community-foster-interdisciplinary-research

Dear Colleagues: Collaboration across disciplines can inspire scientists to consider problems from new perspectives and yield creative new approaches to solving them. To this end, the NIAMS engages partners across the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the researchers we fund, to encourage and support interdisciplinary research. In addition, we often hear from the community about the importance of opportunities to work with researchers in other fields. For example, during listening sessions for the evaluation of our Centers program, support for interdisciplinary team science emerged as a key strategy for spurring innovation. Investigators discussing research gaps and opportunities in areas

Researchers Identify Potential Biomarker for Serious Scleroderma Complication

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/researchers-identify-potential-biomarker-serious-scleroderma

Summary Researchers have linked a small signaling molecule to pulmonary dysfunction in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), a chronic autoimmune disease, according to a study funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). The findings, which appeared in Arthritis & Rheumatology, suggest that the molecule, CCL2, could help identify patients at greatest risk of developing pulmonary problems and represents a potential new therapeutic target for the disease. Background Scleroderma is characterized by scarring of the skin and internal organs, such as the kidneys, heart and lungs. The disease’s severity and symptoms vary widely, but

Arthritis Drug Found to Relieve Chronic Itch in Proof-of-Concept Study

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/arthritis-drug-found-relieve-chronic-itch-proof-concept-study

Summary Working in mice, scientists supported in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) have found that two molecules involved in the inflammatory response also directly activate itch-sensing neurons and trigger the itch sensation. Blocking the molecules’ effects with a medicine used to treat rheumatoid arthritis provided relief in a group of patients experiencing chronic itch that had not responded to other treatments. The findings, which appeared in Cell , suggest that targeting inflammatory pathways could lead to new ways to treat neuronal conditions like chronic itch. Background Chronic itch is the primary
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