NIH researchers crack mystery behind rare bone disorder

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/press-releases/nih-researchers-crack-mystery-behind-rare-bone-disorder

Study finds gene mutations that cause “dripping candle wax” bone disease. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health worked with 15 patients from around the world to uncover a genetic basis of “dripping candle wax” bone disease. The rare disorder, known as melorheostosis, causes excess bone formation that resembles dripping candle wax on x-rays. The results, appearing in Nature Communications, offer potential treatment targets for this rare disease, provide important clues about bone development, and may lead to insights about fracture healing and osteoporosis. Though there are only about 400 known cases of this disorder worldwide, 15 unrelated adults with

Early Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV Patients Tied to Bone Mineral Density Loss

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/early-antiretroviral-therapy-hiv-patients-tied-bone-mineral-density

Antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV-positive patients is associated with a greater loss of bone mineral density -- a major risk factor for bone fractures -- than for those who delay ART, according to a recent international study. The work, cofunded by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), suggests the need for more research on battling the loss of bone mineral density in people with HIV. The results are from a substudy, with approximately 400 patients, of the NIH-supported Strategic Timing of Antiretrovial Treatment (START)

New Clues to the Causes of Lupus

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/new-clues-causes-lupus

Insights from two recent studies suggest novel avenues for treating the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) supported the pair of studies that sought to better understand why the immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissues and organs, as happens in SLE. The work could possibly impact other autoimmune diseases as well. SLE is a chronic, inflammatory illness, that most often strikes women of childbearing age, though men and children also may be affected. The symptoms vary but the most common are sore, swollen joints, muscle aches and

NIAMS Update — March 29, 2018

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsletters/niams-update/2018/niams-update-march-29-2018

*/ /*--> */ /*--> */ /*--> */ SPOTLIGHT Letter From Dr. Stephen I. Katz: Communicating Science to the Public: Context and Curiosity Dear Colleagues, We all share our research progress each day, whether through peer-reviewed journal articles, lectures, tweets or dinner table chats. In our interactions, it is important that we use clear language to convey the exciting advances we are achieving in arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases. Read more. Image: Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D. NEWS Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 Funding Plan The NIAMS is operating under the FY 2018 Omnibus Appropriations bill. The funding plan for research

Communicating Science to the Public: Context and Curiosity

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/about-the-director/letter/communicating-science-public-context-and-curiosity

Dear Colleagues, We all share our research progress each day, whether through peer-reviewed journal articles, lectures, tweets, or dinner table chats. In our interactions, it is important that we use clear language to convey the exciting advances we are achieving in arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases. Each of our varied audiences poses unique communication challenges, whether they be scientists and clinicians, students, policy makers, journalists, patients and caregivers or friends and family. Plain language is a powerful tool to explain our role in “turning discovery into health” – the NIH’s tagline – as we demonstrate transparency and accountability in

NIAMS’ Katz Receives Dermatologists’ Highest Honor

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/announcements/niams-katz-receives-dermatologists-highest-honor

NIAMS Director Dr. Stephen Katz was recently awarded the Gold Medal by the American Academy of Dermatologists (AAD). The Gold Medal is the Academy’s highest tribute, and is presented on a “very selective basis to acknowledge outstanding and exceptional service in the field of dermatology.” Katz has been director of the NIAMS since August 1995 and was also a senior investigator in the Dermatology Branch of the NCI from 1974 to 2014. He has focused his research on immunology and the skin. His work has demonstrated that skin is an important component of the immune system both in its normal

Honoring Health — Addressing the Opioid Overdose Crisis and Other Drug Use in Your Community — March 2018

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsletters/aian-newsletter/2018/aian-newsletter-march-2018

*/ /*--> */ /*--> */ /*--> */ Addressing the Opioid Overdose Crisis and Other Drug Use in Your Community Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone (OxyContin ® ), hydrocodone (Vicodin ® ), codeine, morphine and many others. Prescription pain relievers have been used for years to treat chronic pain, cough and diarrhea. Opioid pain relievers are generally safe when taken for a short time and as prescribed by a doctor, but can be dangerous when misused. Regular use—even as

Optimizing Steroid Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/optimizing-steroid-treatment-duchenne-muscular-dystrophy

Summary Research funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) has revealed insights into glucocorticoid steroid treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Scientists determined mechanisms of how glucocorticoid steroids improve muscle repair and function in mouse models of acute muscle injury and muscular dystrophy, according to a study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation . In a second paper in The Lancet , an international team found that in patients with DMD, long-term glucocorticoid steroid treatment delayed loss of muscle strength and function and decreased risk of death. Background DMD is a
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