Summary

Dr. Amy Coxon is a biologist and lab manager for the Brownell Lab. She has received awards for her research including the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)-AFLAC Young Investigators Award and the American Association for Cancer Research-Pharmingen Young Investigators Awards. She has presented at meetings such as the AACR Mouse Models of Cancer Meeting, the AACR meetings, and the Oncogenes and Tumors Suppressor meetings.  In addition, she received an NIH Office of the Director Honor Award for her work in transferring critical cell lines to a National Cancer Institute cell line repository.

Research Statement

Dr. Coxon worked on lung cancer, developed a model for medullary thyroid cancer that mimicked human MEN2A mutations, and studied a translocation involved in the development of salivary gland cancer, before coming to work in the Brownell Lab.  In the Brownell Lab, she is involved in the study of merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare and aggressive skin cancer. She also investigates the Merkel cell polyomavirus that drives MCC. Dr. Coxon applies her expertise in molecular biology, mouse genetics, and xenograft models to investigate the pathobiology of MCC with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic targets. 

Scientific Publications

Hedgehog Signalling inhibitors fail to reduce Merkel cell carcinoma viability.

Carroll TM, Williams JS, Daily K, Rogers T, Gelb T, Coxon A, Wang SQ, Crago AM, Busam KJ, Brownell I.

Assessment of Cancer Cell Line Representatives Using Microarrays for Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

Kenneth Daily, Amy Coxon, Jonathan S. Williams, Chyi-Chia R. Lee, Daniel G. Coit, Klaus J. Busam, and Isaac Brownell.

Enhanced activity of the CREB co-activator Crtc1 in LKB1 null lung cancer.

T. Komiya, A Coxon, Y Park, WD Chen, M Zajac-Kay, P Meltzder, T Karpova, and FJ Kaye.

Mect1-Maml2 Fusion Oncogene Linked to the Aberrant Activation of Cyclic AMP/CREB Regulated Genes.

Amy Coxon, Ester Rozenblum, Yoon-Soo Park, Nina Joshi, Junji Tsurutani, Phillip A. Dennis, Ilan R. Kirsch, and Frederic J. Kaye.

t(11;19)(q21;p13) translocation in mucoepidermoid carcinoma creates a novel fusion product that disrupts a Notch signaling pathway.

Tonon, G., Modi, S., Wu, L., Kubo, A., Coxon, A., Komiya, T., O’Neil, K., Stover, K., El-Naggar, A., Griffin, J., Kirsch, I., and Kaye, F.

Protein expression of the RB-related gene family and SV40 large T antigen in mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Modi, S., Kubo, A., Oie, H., Coxon, A. B., Rehmatulla, A., and Kaye, F. J.

Education

George Washington University
Ph.D., Genetics, 2000
 
Liberty University
B.S., Biology, 1991

Experience

Biologist 
Brownell Lab, NIAMS, NIH
 
Professorial Lecturer, Genetics
George Washington University
 
Faculty, Genetics 
Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences
 
Part-time Faculty, Bioethics
Trinity International University Summer Pre-med Institute

Last Updated: August 2017