Enter a phrase above to search files and articles within the site.

Typically materials that are more than 5 years old will be archived

Osteoporosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/osteoporosis

What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become weak and brittle. This increases your risk of broken bones (fractures). Osteoporosis is a “silent” disease because you may not have symptoms. You may not even know you have the disease until you break a bone. Breaks can occur in any bone but happen most often in: Hip bones. Vertebrae in the spine. Wrist. You can take steps to help prevent osteoporosis and broken bones by: Doing weight-bearing exercises, such as walking or dancing, and lifting weights. Not drinking too much alcohol. Quitting smoking, or not starting if

Osteoporosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/osteoporosis

¿Qué es la osteoporosis? La osteoporosis es una enfermedad que hace que los huesos se debiliten y se vuelvan quebradizos. Esto aumenta el riesgo de que se rompa un hueso (fractura). Se conoce a la osteoporosis como "la enfermedad silenciosa", ya que puede que usted no presente síntomas. Es posible que ni siquiera sepa que tiene la enfermedad hasta que se le rompa un hueso. Las fracturas pueden suceder en cualquier hueso, pero ocurren con más frecuencia en: las caderas, las vértebras de la columna, la muñeca. Puede tomar las siguientes medidas para ayudar a prevenir la osteoporosis y evitar

Osteoporosis in Aging

https://www.niams.nih.gov/osteoporosis-aging

Bones feel solid, but the inside of a bone is actually filled with holes like a honeycomb. Bone tissues are broken down and rebuilt all the time. While some cells build new bone tissue, others dissolve bone and release the minerals inside. As we get older, we begin to lose more bone than we build. The tiny holes within bones get bigger, and the solid outer layer becomes thinner. In other words, our bones get less dense. Hard bones turn spongy, and spongy bones turn spongier. If this loss of bone density goes too far, it’s called osteoporosis. Over 10

Osteoporosis Facebook Q&A

https://www.niams.nih.gov/osteoporosis-facebook-qa

Partnering with the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the National Bone Health Alliance , NIAMS hosted a bilingual Facebook Q&A about osteoporosis on May 26, 2016. This was the first Facebook chat for NIAMS, and the first bilingual (English/Spanish) Facebook event by any NIH Institute or Center. The partners solicited questions from Facebook followers for two weeks before the event and addressed those and “live” questions during the Q&A session. Topics discussed in the chat included treatments, supplements, comorbid conditions and osteoporosis in men. Joan McGowan, Ph.D., Director of the NIAMS Division of Musculoskeletal Diseases (DMD), and Lee Alekel, Ph.D., a

Osteoporosis Facebook Q&A

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/meetings-events/osteoporosis-facebook-qa

Partnering with the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the National Bone Health Alliance , NIAMS hosted a bilingual Facebook Q&A about osteoporosis on May 26, 2016. This was the first Facebook chat for NIAMS, and the first bilingual (English/Spanish) Facebook event by any NIH Institute or Center. The partners solicited questions from Facebook followers for two weeks before the event and addressed those and “live” questions during the Q&A session. Topics discussed in the chat included treatments, supplements, comorbid conditions and osteoporosis in men. Joan McGowan, Ph.D., Director of the NIAMS Division of Musculoskeletal Diseases (DMD), and Lee Alekel, Ph.D., a

Consolidating Skeletal Benefits after Short-Term Combination Osteoporosis Therapy: The DATA-EX Study

https://www.niams.nih.gov/grants-funding/clinical-trials-spotlight/consolidating-skeletal-benefits-after-short-term

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) supports a range of clinical trials studying new and existing interventions for prevention and treatment of arthritis, musculoskeletal, and skin diseases. Recruitment for this clinical trial complete. Updates will be made to this page when the study completes data

Parathyroid Hormone Signaling Pathway Reveals New Strategy for Treating Osteoporosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/parathyroid-hormone-signaling-pathway-reveals-new-strategy-treating

Investigators funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) have identified a chemical compound that increases bone mass in mice. The compound, which blocks parathyroid hormone (PTH) signaling, offers a promising new approach for treating osteoporosis and related conditions. The study appeared in Nature Communications. While our bones may seem static, in fact they are in constant flux. There is a continuous balancing act between cells called osteoblasts, which work to form bone, and cells known as osteoclasts, which degrade bone. A third type of cell, the osteocyte, sends signals to stimulate

NIAMS and NIA Outline Next Steps Following Osteoporosis Pathways to Prevention Federal Partners’ Meeting

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/announcements/niams-and-nia-outline-next-steps-following-osteoporosis-pathways-prevention

In October 2018, the National Institutes of Health convened a Pathways to Prevention (P2P) workshop on the Appropriate Use of Drug Therapies for Osteoporotic Fracture Prevention. As a follow-up to the workshop and an expert panel report containing research recommendations, several NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices and other federal agencies met to explore opportunities for collaborations and to outline research opportunities and next steps that will move the field forward. The federal partners issued a report of their deliberations, which is available through the Office of Disease Prevention (ODP) website. As part of the next steps, the National Institute of

Newly Discovered Thyroid Hormone Receptor Helps Control Bone Formation Advance Offers Novel Strategy for Treating Osteoporosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/thyroid-hormone-receptor-helps-treat-osteoporosis

Researchers funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) have discovered a form of the thyroid hormone receptor that accounts for some of thyroid hormone’s effects, including its role in bone development and maintenance. A chemical compound that mimics activation of the newly identified receptor promoted bone formation in mice, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for enhancing bone health.
Kristy Nicks, Ph.D.
Program Director
301-827-3354

Twitter Chat on Minority Women’s Health (FDAWomen)

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/meetings-events/social-media-events/twitter-chat-minority-womens-health-fdawomen

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held a bilingual (English/Spanish) Twitter chat on minority women’s health on April 19, 2016. NIAMS tweeted about its Spanish and Asian language publications and health issues of special concern to minority women, including lupus, fibromyalgia and osteoporosis. Tweets for the chat can be viewed by searching for #FDAHealthChat on Twitter and scrolling down to the tweets for April 19, 2016.

NIAMS Twitter Presentation: Dr. Katz C-SPAN Interview

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/meetings-events/social-media-events/niams-twitter-presentation-dr-katz-c-span-interview

On March 13, 2014, the NIAMS hosted a Twitter presentation featuring the questions and answers from a February 21 interview given by Dr. Katz on the C-SPAN program Washington Journal. Questions covered topics such as the heritability of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis; the relationship between the NIH and pharmaceutical companies; the purpose of NIH clinical research; and the causes of, and research on, various diseases. The presentation reached a potential audience of 278,269 Twitter users.