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Raynaud’s Phenomenon

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s phenomenon? Raynaud’s phenomenon is a condition that affects your blood vessels. If you have Raynaud’s phenomenon, you have periods of time called “attacks” when your body does not send enough blood to the hands and feet. Attacks usually happen when you are cold or feeling stressed. During an attack, your fingers and toes may feel very cold or numb. Raynaud’s phenomenon is also called Raynaud’s disease or Raynaud’s syndrome.

Fenómeno de Raynaud

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

¿Qué es el fenómeno de Raynaud? El fenómeno de Raynaud es una enfermedad que afecta los vasos sanguíneos. Si usted tiene el fenómeno de Raynaud, tiene periodos llamados "episodios" cuando el cuerpo no envía suficiente sangre a las manos y los pies. Los episodios generalmente ocurren cuando la persona tiene frío o se siente estresada. Durante un episodio, los dedos de las manos y los pies pueden sentirse muy fríos o entumecidos. El fenómeno de Raynaud también se conoce como la enfermedad de Raynaud o el síndrome de Raynaud.

The Effect of Atorvastatin on Microvascular Endothelial Function and Raynaud in Early Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/grants-funding/clinical-trials-spotlight/effect-atorvastatin-microvascular-endothelial-function-and

Clinical Trials in the Spotlight Main Page The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) supports a range of clinical trials studying new and existing interventions for prevention and treatment of arthritis, musculoskeletal, and skin diseases. Investigators supported by the NIAMS need your help finding individuals to

What Is NIAMS?

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/what-is-niams

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) is one of 27 Institutes and Centers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the nation’s premier biomedical research agency. Established in 1986, the NIAMS supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases.
Psoriasis info card

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes red, scaly skin. Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes red, scaly skin that may feel painful, swollen or hot.

If you have psoriasis, you are more likely to get some other conditions, including:

  •  Psoriatic arthritis, a condition that causes joint pain and swelling.
  • Cardiovascular problems, which affect the heart and blood circulation system.
  • Obesity.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Diabetes.

Some treatments for psoriasis can have serious side effects, so be sure to talk about them with your doctor and keep all your appointments.

Learn more about psoriasis »

Tips for Living with Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic disease, which means it lasts a long time. You can take an active role in treating your psoriasis. Besides going to your doctor regularly, here are some things you can try to help manage your symptoms:

  • Keeping your skin well moisturized.
  • Staying healthy overall.
  • Joining support groups or counseling to help you realize you are not alone in dealing with psoriasis and to share ideas for coping with the disease.

Points to Remember

  • Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes red, scaly skin.
  • It is caused by genes, meaning it runs in families, but some outside factors can make it worse or trigger flares.
  • Psoriasis can be hard to diagnose because it can look like other skin diseases.
  • Your doctor may recommend creams, ultraviolet light therapy, prescription medications, shots, or some combination of these treatments.
  • You may have to try a couple of different treatments before finding one that helps you.
  • Joining a support group helps some people with psoriasis cope with the disease.

What Others are Saying About the Accelerating Medicines Partnership’s Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus Network Awards

https://www.niams.nih.gov/grants-funding/funded-research/accelerating-medicines/what-others-are-saying

NIAMS updated this page February 13, 2017, due to organization name changes. What Others are Saying About the Accelerating Medicines Partnership’s Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus Network Awards AbbVie: "AbbVie is proud to support the AMP RA/Lupus Network and collaborate on emerging research to improve the treatment options for patients living

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/lupus

What is systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus)? Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is a chronic (long-lasting) autoimmune disease that can affect many parts of the body, including the: Skin. Joints. Heart. Lungs. Kidneys. Brain. Lupus happens when the immune system, which normally helps protect the body from infection and disease, attacks its own tissues. This attack causes inflammation and, in some cases, permanent tissue damage. If you have lupus, you may have times of illness (flares) and times of wellness (remission). Lupus flares can be mild to serious, and they do not follow a pattern. However, with treatment, many people with lupus

Roundtable on Scleroderma: Advancing Potential Drugs to Patient Care

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/meetings-events/roundtables/roundtable-scleroderma-advancing-potential-drugs-patient-care

Roundtable on Scleroderma: Advancing Potential Drugs to Patient Care February 27, 2015 Background Scleroderma is a complex disease resulting from inflammation and soft tissue fibrosis (hardening). The organ and tissue systems affected by the disease include skin, blood vessels, gastrointestinal tract, lung, heart, kidney, muscles, and joints. Scleroderma is considered an autoimmune disease, in which much of the tissue damage is thought to be caused by the patient’s own immune system. Clinically, this progressive disease is challenging to treat or prevent since there is no proven, approved therapy to alter the underlying cause. Fibrosis results in high morbidity for patients

Roundtable on Scleroderma: Advancing Potential Drugs to Patient Care

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/meetings-events/roundtables/scleroderma-advancing-potential-drugs-to-patient-care

Background Scleroderma is a complex disease resulting from inflammation and soft tissue fibrosis (hardening). The organ and tissue systems affected by the disease include skin, blood vessels, gastrointestinal tract, lung, heart, kidney, muscles, and joints. Scleroderma is considered an autoimmune disease, in which much of the tissue damage is thought to be caused by the patient’s own immune system. Clinically, this progressive disease is challenging to treat or prevent since there is no proven, approved therapy to alter the underlying cause. Fibrosis results in high morbidity for patients with substantial impact on their quality of life, as well as high

Roundtable on the Role of Disc Degeneration in Neck and Back Pain

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/meetings-events/roundtables/roundtable-role-disc-degeneration-neck-and-back-pain

Meeting Summary Also see Role of Disc Degeneration in Pain Explored , NIH Record (January 16, 2015) Scroll down to fifth item. Background Neck and back pain is a significant public health problem in the United States. Approximately 11-14 percent of working age adults will experience work-related activity limitations due to neck pain. 1 Many more are affected by low back pain; 70 percent of Americans experience low back pain that is serious enough to disrupt daily routines during their lifetime. 2 Chronic spinal pain is often progressive, and its causes can be difficult to determine. It also is expensive.

February 4, 2015 Council Minutes

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/working-groups/advisory-council/council-minutes/february-4-2015-council-minutes

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Service National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council Minutes of the 85th Meeting 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. CALL TO ORDER The 85th meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council (NAMSAC) was held on February 4, 2015, at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Campus, Building 31, Conference Room 6. The meeting was chaired by Dr. Stephen I. Katz, Director, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). Attendance Council members present Dr. Joan E. Bechtold Dr. Sherine E. Gabriel Ms. Michelle Hofhine

Lupus eritematoso sistémico (lupus)

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/lupus

¿Qué es el lupus eritematoso sistémico (lupus)? El lupus eritematoso sistémico es una enfermedad autoinmunitaria crónica (de larga duración) y que puede afectar muchas partes del cuerpo, tales como: la piel las articulaciones el corazón los pulmones los riñones el cerebro. El lupus ocurre cuando el sistema inmunitario, que normalmente ayuda a proteger al cuerpo contra infecciones y enfermedades, ataca sus propios tejidos. Este ataque causa inflamación y, en algunos casos, daño permanente de los tejidos. Si usted tiene lupus, puede haber momentos en los que está enfermo (brotes) y períodos en que está bien (remisión). Los brotes de lupus

February 5, 2013 Council Meeting Minutes

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/working-groups/advisory-council/council-minutes/february-5-2013-council-meeting-minutes

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Service National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council Minutes of the 79th Meeting 8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. CALL TO ORDER The 79th meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council (NAMSAC) was held on February 5, 2013, at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Campus, Building 31, Conference Room 6. The meeting was chaired by Dr. Stephen I. Katz, Director, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). Attendance Council members present Dr. Lynda F. Bonewald Dr. David R. Eyre Dr. Gary Firestein

September 27, 2011 Council Meeting Minutes

https://www.niams.nih.gov/about/working-groups/advisory-council/council-minutes/september-27-2011-council-meeting-minutes

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Service National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council Minutes of the 75th Meeting 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This portion of the meeting occurred during closed session. CALL TO ORDER The 75th meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NAMS) Advisory Council was held on September 27, 2011, at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Campus, Building 31, Conference Room 6. The meeting was chaired by Dr. Stephen Katz, Director, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). Attendance Council members present Dr. Lynda F.