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Raynaud’s Phenomenon

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s phenomenon? Raynaud’s phenomenon is a condition that affects your blood vessels. If you have Raynaud’s phenomenon, you have periods of time called “attacks” when your body does not send enough blood to the hands and feet. Attacks usually happen when you are cold or feeling stressed. During an attack, your fingers and toes may feel very cold or numb. Raynaud’s phenomenon is also called Raynaud’s disease or Raynaud’s syndrome.

Fenómeno de Raynaud

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

¿Qué es el fenómeno de Raynaud? El fenómeno de Raynaud es una enfermedad que afecta los vasos sanguíneos. Si usted tiene el fenómeno de Raynaud, tiene periodos llamados "episodios" cuando el cuerpo no envía suficiente sangre a las manos y los pies. Los episodios generalmente ocurren cuando la persona tiene frío o se siente estresada. Durante un episodio, los dedos de las manos y los pies pueden sentirse muy fríos o entumecidos. El fenómeno de Raynaud también se conoce como la enfermedad de Raynaud o el síndrome de Raynaud.

Reactive Arthritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/reactive-arthritis

What is reactive arthritis? Reactive arthritis is pain or swelling in a joint that is caused by an infection in your body. You may also have red, swollen eyes and a swollen urinary tract. These symptoms may occur alone, together, or not at all. Most people with reactive arthritis recover fully from the first flare of symptoms and can return to regular activities 2 to 6 months later. Some people will have long-term, mild arthritis. A few patients will have long-term, severe arthritis that is difficult to control with treatment and may cause joint damage.

Arthritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/arthritis

What is arthritis? "Arthritis" literally means joint inflammation. Although joint inflammation is a symptom or sign rather than a specific diagnosis, the term arthritis is often used to refer to any disorder that affects the joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, heart, or skin, can also be affected. Fortunately, current treatments allow most people with arthritis to lead active and productive lives.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/rheumatoid-arthritis

What is rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that mostly affects joints, such as the wrist, hands, feet, spine, knees, and jaw. In joints, RA causes inflammation that leads to: Pain. Swelling Stiffness. Loss of function. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder because the immune system attacks the healthy joint tissues. Normally, the immune system helps protect the body from infection and disease. RA may cause you to feel unusually tired, to have occasional fevers, and to have a loss of appetite. It also may cause other medical problems in the heart, lungs, blood, nerves, eyes

Knee Problems

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/knee-problems

What are knee problems? Knee problems happen when you injure or develop disease in your knee and it can’t do its job. The knees provide stable support for the body. They also allow your legs to bend and straighten. Both flexibility and stability are needed to stand, walk, run, crouch, jump, and turn. Other parts of your body help the knees do their job. These are: Bones. Cartilage. Muscles. Ligaments. Tendons.