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Raynaud’s Phenomenon

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s phenomenon? Raynaud’s phenomenon is a condition that causes the blood vessels in the hands and feet to narrow, decreasing blood flow. When this happens, parts of the body—usually the fingers and toes—become cold and numb, and change color (usually, to white or blue). An attack usually happens from exposure to cold or stress.

Fenómeno de Raynaud

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

¿Qué es el fenómeno de Raynaud? El fenómeno de Raynaud es un trastorno que hace que los vasos sanguíneos de las manos y los pies se vuelvan más angostos, disminuyendo así el flujo sanguíneo. Cuando esto sucede, partes del cuerpo, usualmente los dedos de las manos y los pies, se enfrían y se adormecen, y cambian de color (por lo general, se ponen blancos o azules). A menudo, un ataque o episodio de estos ocurre por exposición al frío o por estrés.

Bursitis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/bursitis

What is bursitis? Bursitis is a common condition that causes swelling and pain around muscles and bones. Bursitis is the swelling of the bursa, a small, fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between a bone and other moving parts, such as muscles, tendons, or skin.

Ankylosing Spondylitis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/ankylosing-spondylitis

What is ankylosing spondylitis? Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis that causes inflammation in certain parts of the spine. Over time, this inflammation in the joints and tissues of the spine can cause stiffness. In severe cases, this may cause the bones in the spine to grow together, which can lead to a rigid spine that is difficult to bend. Many people with ankylosing spondylitis have mild episodes of back pain and stiffness that come and go. But others have severe, ongoing back pain and stiffness. Other symptoms also may develop if other areas of the body are affected

Paget’s Disease of Bone

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/pagets-disease-bone

What is Paget’s disease? Paget’s disease of bone is a chronic (long-lasting) disorder that causes bones to grow larger and become weaker than normal. Usually only one or a few bones have the disease. Many people with Paget’s disease do not have symptoms. However, the bone changes can cause: Bone pain. Misshapen bones. Broken bones (fractures). Problems in the joints near the bones with the disease. With treatment, many people can: Manage their symptoms. Improve pain. Control the effects of the disease.

Bioengineered Compound May Aid in Treating Osteoarthritic Joints

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/bioengineered-compound-may-aid-treating

A bioengineered molecule designed to bind together key components found in the fluid that surrounds joint areas may improve lubrication and minimize friction. This could potentially slow the degeneration of cartilage tissue that occurs in knee osteoarthritis, according to a study conducted in rats and funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. The study was published in Nature Materials. The synovial fluid that bathes our joints is composed of several types of lubricants, including hyaluronic acid (HA) and lubricin. In healthy joints, this fluid ensures that tissues move together smoothly and without

MRI Findings Reveal Early Changes to Joint That Predict Development of Knee Osteoarthritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/mri-findings-reveal-early-changes

Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a team of scientists has detected structural changes in the knee joint that precede signs of osteoarthritis seen on X-rays. The study, which was supported in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), calls into question the assumption that damage to cartilage is the primary underlying cause of osteoarthritis. The findings appeared in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology.