Enter a phrase above to search files and articles within the site.

Typically materials that are more than 5 years old will be archived
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10 results

Osteonecrosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/osteonecrosis

What is osteonecrosis? Osteonecrosis is a bone disease. It results from the loss of blood supply to the bone. Without blood, the bone tissue dies. This causes the bone to collapse. It may also cause the joints that surround the bone to collapse. If you have osteonecrosis, you may have pain or be limited in your physical activity. Osteonecrosis can develop in any bone, most often in the: Thigh bone (femur). Upper arm bone (humerus). Knees. Shoulders. Ankles. It is also called: Avascular necrosis. Aseptic necrosis. Ischemic necrosis.

Ichthyosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/ichthyosis

What is ichthyosis? Ichthyosis is a group of skin disorders. It leads to dry, itchy skin that appears scaly, rough, and red. The symptoms can range from mild to severe. Ichthyosis can affect only the skin, but sometimes the disease can affect internal organs, too.

Sports Injuries

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sports-injuries

What are sports injuries? Sports injuries are injuries that happen when playing sports or exercising. There are two kinds of sports injuries: Acute injuries occur suddenly when playing or exercising. For example: Sprained ankles. Strained backs. Broken bones. Chronic injuries happen after you play a sport or exercise for a long time.

Ankylosing Spondylitis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/ankylosing-spondylitis

What is ankylosing spondylitis? Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis that causes inflammation in certain parts of the spine. Over time, this inflammation in the joints and tissues of the spine can cause stiffness. In severe cases, this may cause the bones in the spine to grow together, which can lead to a rigid spine that is difficult to bend. Many people with ankylosing spondylitis have mild episodes of back pain and stiffness that come and go. But others have severe, ongoing back pain and stiffness. Other symptoms also may develop if other areas of the body are affected

Sjögren’s Syndrome

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sjogrens-syndrome

What is Sjögren’s syndrome? Sjögren’s syndrome is a disease that affects the glands that make moisture. It most often causes dryness in the mouth and eyes. It can also lead to dryness in other places that need moisture, such as the nose, throat, and skin. Sjögren’s syndrome is also a rheumatic disease, which affect: Joints. Tendons. Ligaments. Bones. Muscles. The signs and symptoms of rheumatic diseases can include: Redness or heat. Swelling. Pain. Loss of function. Primary Versus Secondary Sjögren’s Syndrome Doctors have two categories for Sjögren’s syndrome: Primary form: Occurs if you do not have other rheumatic diseases. Secondary

Sports Injuries in Youth: A Guide for Parents

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sports-injuries-in-youth

What are sports injuries in youth? Although sports injuries can range from scrapes and bruises to serious brain and spinal cord injuries, most fall somewhere between the two extremes. Here are some of the more common types of injuries: Muscle sprains and strains. Injuries of a growth plate, area of tissue at the end of the long bones in growing children and teens. Injuries from overuse of muscles and tendons. Learn more about sports injuries.

Same Immune Regulatory Protein Found to Play Instrumental Role in Two Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/same-immune-regulatory-protein-found

Research funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) has revealed a new role for A20, a protein that regulates a key immune response pathway, in certain early-onset autoinflammatory diseases. The results suggest that targeting this pathway could be an effective strategy for treating these diseases, and possibly related conditions, as well.