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Displaying 1 - 11 of 11 results

Bursitis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/bursitis

What is bursitis? Bursitis is a common condition that causes swelling and pain around muscles and bones. Bursitis is the swelling of the bursa, a small, fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between a bone and other moving parts, such as muscles, tendons, or skin.

Giant Cell Arteritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/giant-cell-arteritis

What is giant cell arteritis? Giant cell arteritis causes the arteries of the scalp and neck to become red, hot, swollen, or painful. The arteries most affected are those in the temples on either side of the head. These arteries narrow, so not enough blood can pass through. It is important that you get treatment right away. Otherwise, the arteries could be permanently damaged. There is also a risk of blindness or stroke. If you have giant cell arteritis, your doctor should also look for signs of another disorder, polymyalgia rheumatica. These conditions often occur together.

Vitiligo

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/vitiligo

What is vitiligo? Vitiligo is a chronic (long-lasting) disorder that causes areas of skin to lose color. When skin cells that make color are attacked and destroyed, the skin turns a milky-white color. No one knows what causes vitiligo, but it may be an autoimmune disease. In people with autoimmune diseases, the immune cells attack the body’s own healthy tissues by mistake, instead of viruses or bacteria. A person with vitiligo sometimes may have family members who also have the disease. There is no cure for vitiligo, but treatment may help skin tone appear more even.

Sjögren’s Syndrome

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sjogrens-syndrome

What is Sjögren’s syndrome? Sjögren’s syndrome is a disease that affects the glands that make moisture. It most often causes dryness in the mouth and eyes. It can also lead to dryness in other places that need moisture, such as the nose, throat, and skin. Sjögren’s syndrome is also a rheumatic disease, which affect: Joints. Tendons. Ligaments. Bones. Muscles. The signs and symptoms of rheumatic diseases can include: Redness or heat. Swelling. Pain. Loss of function. Primary Versus Secondary Sjögren’s Syndrome Doctors have two categories for Sjögren’s syndrome: Primary form: Occurs if you do not have other rheumatic diseases. Secondary

Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/modified-protein-improves-vitiligo-symptoms-mice

Altering a key protein involved in the development of vitiligo may protect against—or even reverse—the pigmentation loss associated with the skin disorder in mice, according to recent research funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, and published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Vitiligo is a progressive autoimmune disease in which the skin cells that impart color (melanocytes) are destroyed, resulting in white patches on the face, hands and other parts of the body. Scientists are unsure what causes vitiligo. They are investigating the biological mechanisms that trigger the disease, as well as its

Same Immune Regulatory Protein Found to Play Instrumental Role in Two Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases

https://www.niams.nih.gov/newsroom/spotlight-on-research/same-immune-regulatory-protein-found

Research funded in part by the NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) has revealed a new role for A20, a protein that regulates a key immune response pathway, in certain early-onset autoinflammatory diseases. The results suggest that targeting this pathway could be an effective strategy for treating these diseases, and possibly related conditions, as well.