Enter a phrase above to search files and articles within the site.

Typically materials that are more than 5 years old will be archived

Lichen Sclerosus

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/lichen-sclerosus

What is lichen sclerosus? Lichen sclerosus is a long-term problem that usually affects the skin of the genital and anal areas. The disease can also appear on the upper body, breasts, and upper arms. The disease does not cause skin cancer but may increase your risk for cancer if your skin is scarred. You should see your doctor every 6 to 12 months in order to follow and treat skin changes.

Psoriasis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/psoriasis

What is psoriasis? Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes red, scaly skin that may feel painful, swollen or hot. If you have psoriasis, you are more likely to get some other conditions, including: Psoriatic arthritis, a condition that causes joint pain and swelling. Cardiovascular problems, which affect the heart and blood circulation system. Obesity. High blood pressure. Diabetes. Some treatments for psoriasis can have serious side effects, so be sure to talk about them with your doctor and keep all your appointments.

Osteonecrosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/osteonecrosis

What is osteonecrosis? Osteonecrosis is a bone disease. It results from the loss of blood supply to the bone. Without blood, the bone tissue dies. This causes the bone to collapse. It may also cause the joints that surround the bone to collapse. If you have osteonecrosis, you may have pain or be limited in your physical activity. Osteonecrosis can develop in any bone, most often in the: Thigh bone (femur). Upper arm bone (humerus). Knees. Shoulders. Ankles. It is also called: Avascular necrosis. Aseptic necrosis. Ischemic necrosis.

Back Pain

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/back-pain

What is back pain? Back pain is one of the most common medical problems in the United States. It might feel like a dull, constant ache or a sudden, sharp pain. Back pain can result from: An accident. A fall. Lifting something heavy. Changes that happen in the spine as you age. A disorder or medical condition. Treatment depends on the cause and symptoms of your pain. You can do things to improve your health and lower your chance of developing chronic (long-lasting) back pain.