Enter a phrase above to search files and articles within the site.

Typically materials that are more than 5 years old will be archived
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9 results

Raynaud’s Phenomenon

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s phenomenon? Raynaud’s phenomenon is a condition that causes the blood vessels in the hands and feet to narrow, decreasing blood flow. When this happens, parts of the body—usually the fingers and toes—become cold and numb, and change color (usually, to white or blue). An attack usually happens from exposure to cold or stress.

Fenómeno de Raynaud

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

¿Qué es el fenómeno de Raynaud? El fenómeno de Raynaud es un trastorno que hace que los vasos sanguíneos de las manos y los pies se vuelvan más angostos, disminuyendo así el flujo sanguíneo. Cuando esto sucede, partes del cuerpo, usualmente los dedos de las manos y los pies, se enfrían y se adormecen, y cambian de color (por lo general, se ponen blancos o azules). A menudo, un ataque o episodio de estos ocurre por exposición al frío o por estrés.

Scleroderma

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/scleroderma

What is scleroderma? Scleroderma is an autoimmune connective tissue and rheumatic disease that causes inflammation in the skin and other areas of the body. This inflammation leads to patches of tight, hard skin. Scleroderma involves many systems in your body. A connective tissue disease is one that affects tissues such as skin, tendons, and cartilage. There are two major types of scleroderma: Localized scleroderma only affects the skin and the structures directly under the skin. Systemic scleroderma, also called systemic sclerosis, affects many systems in the body. This is the more serious type of scleroderma and can damage your blood

Acne

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/acne

What is acne? Acne is a common skin condition that happens when hair follicles under the skin become clogged. Oil and dead skin cells plug the pores, and outbreaks of lesions (often called pimples or zits) can happen. Most often, the outbreaks occur on the face but can also appear on the back, chest, and shoulders. For most people, acne tends to go away by the time they reach their thirties, but some people in their forties and fifties continue to have this skin problem.

Epidermolysis Bullosa

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/epidermolysis-bullosa

What is epidermolysis bullosa? Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of rare diseases that cause fragile skin that leads to blisters and tearing. Tears, sores, and blisters in the skin happen when something rubs or bumps the skin. They can appear anywhere on the body. In severe cases, blisters may also develop inside the body. The symptoms of the disease usually begin at birth or during infancy and range from mild to severe.

Giant Cell Arteritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/giant-cell-arteritis

What is giant cell arteritis? Giant cell arteritis causes the arteries of the scalp and neck to become red, hot, swollen, or painful. The arteries most affected are those in the temples on either side of the head. These arteries narrow, so not enough blood can pass through. It is important that you get treatment right away. Otherwise, the arteries could be permanently damaged. There is also a risk of blindness or stroke. If you have giant cell arteritis, your doctor should also look for signs of another disorder, polymyalgia rheumatica. These conditions often occur together.

Sports Injuries

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sports-injuries

What are sports injuries? Sports injuries are injuries that happen when playing sports or exercising. There are two kinds of sports injuries: Acute injuries occur suddenly when playing or exercising. For example: Sprained ankles. Strained backs. Broken bones. Chronic injuries happen after you play a sport or exercise for a long time.

Sprains and Strains

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sprains-and-strains

What are sprains and strains? A sprain is an injury to a ligament (tissue that connects two or more bones at a joint). When a sprain happens, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. A strain is an injury to a muscle or tendon (fibrous cords of tissue that connect muscle to bone). In a strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn.

Reactive Arthritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/reactive-arthritis

What is reactive arthritis? Reactive arthritis happens when an infection causes joint pain and swelling. A bacterial infection in the digestive or urinary tract or the genitals usually triggers the condition, but arthritis symptoms typically do not start until a few weeks after you have recovered from the infection. The most common features of reactive arthritis are inflammation of the joints (especially the knees and ankles), eyes, and urinary tract, but not everyone gets all three, or they might not happen at the same time.