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Raynaud’s Phenomenon

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s phenomenon? Raynaud’s phenomenon is a condition that affects your blood vessels. If you have Raynaud’s phenomenon, you have periods of time called “attacks” when your body does not send enough blood to the hands and feet. Attacks usually happen when you are cold or feeling stressed. During an attack, your fingers and toes may feel very cold or numb. Raynaud’s phenomenon is also called Raynaud’s disease or Raynaud’s syndrome.

Fenómeno de Raynaud

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/raynauds-phenomenon

¿Qué es el fenómeno de Raynaud? El fenómeno de Raynaud es una enfermedad que afecta los vasos sanguíneos. Si usted tiene el fenómeno de Raynaud, tiene periodos llamados "episodios" cuando el cuerpo no envía suficiente sangre a las manos y los pies. Los episodios generalmente ocurren cuando la persona tiene frío o se siente estresada. Durante un episodio, los dedos de las manos y los pies pueden sentirse muy fríos o entumecidos. El fenómeno de Raynaud también se conoce como la enfermedad de Raynaud o el síndrome de Raynaud.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/lupus

What is systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus)? Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is a chronic (long-lasting) autoimmune disease that can affect many parts of the body, including the: Skin. Joints. Heart. Lungs. Kidneys. Brain. Lupus happens when the immune system, which normally helps protect the body from infection and disease, attacks its own tissues. This attack causes inflammation and, in some cases, permanent tissue damage. If you have lupus, you may have times of illness (flares) and times of wellness (remission). Lupus flares can be mild to serious, and they do not follow a pattern. However, with treatment, many people with lupus

Lupus eritematoso sistémico (lupus)

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/lupus

¿Qué es el lupus eritematoso sistémico (lupus)? El lupus eritematoso sistémico es una enfermedad autoinmunitaria crónica (de larga duración) y que puede afectar muchas partes del cuerpo, tales como: la piel las articulaciones el corazón los pulmones los riñones el cerebro. El lupus ocurre cuando el sistema inmunitario, que normalmente ayuda a proteger al cuerpo contra infecciones y enfermedades, ataca sus propios tejidos. Este ataque causa inflamación y, en algunos casos, daño permanente de los tejidos. Si usted tiene lupus, puede haber momentos en los que está enfermo (brotes) y períodos en que está bien (remisión). Los brotes de lupus

Polymyalgia Rheumatica

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/polymyalgia-rheumatica

What is polymyalgia rheumatica? Polymyalgia rheumatica causes muscle pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulder, and hip. The pain and stiffness usually occur in the morning or when you haven’t been moving for a while. It typically lasts longer than 30 minutes. For most people, the condition develops over time. But for some people it can start quickly – even overnight. In addition to stiffness, you may have a fever, weakness, and weight loss. Polymyalgia rheumatica usually goes away within one year, but it could last several years. People with polymyalgia rheumatica often have giant cell arteritis a disorder associated

Ichthyosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/ichthyosis

What is ichthyosis? Ichthyosis is a disorder that causes dry, thickened skin that may look like fish scales. The disease is usually passed down from your parents. Symptoms usually start showing up at about one year of age. The disease affects you throughout life.

Pemphigus

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/pemphigus

What is pemphigus? Pemphigus is a type of disease where the body’s immune system attacks healthy cells in the top layer of skin (epidermis). It causes blisters on the skin and in the mouth, nose, throat, eyes, and genitals. Some forms of pemphigus can cause death if not treated.

Lichen Sclerosus

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/lichen-sclerosus

What is lichen sclerosus? Lichen sclerosus is a long-term problem that usually affects the skin of the genital and anal areas. The disease can also appear on the upper body, breasts, and upper arms. The disease does not cause skin cancer but may increase your risk for cancer if your skin is scarred. You should see your doctor every 6 to 12 months in order to follow and treat skin changes.

Scoliosis in Children and Adolescents

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/scoliosis

What is scoliosis? Scoliosis is a disorder in which there is a sideways curve of the spine. Curves are often S-shaped or C-shaped. In most people, there is no known cause for this curve. Curves frequently follow patterns that have been studied in previous patients (see "Curved patterns of the spine" diagram). People with milder curves may only need to visit their doctor for regular check-ups. Some people who have scoliosis need treatment.

Bursitis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/bursitis

What is bursitis? Bursitis is a common condition that causes swelling and pain around muscles and bones. Bursitis is the swelling of the bursa, a small, fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between a bone and other moving parts, such as muscles, tendons, or skin.

Spinal Stenosis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/spinal-stenosis

What is spinal stenosis? In people with spinal stenosis, the spine is narrowed in one or more areas: The space at the center of the spine. The canals where nerves branch out from the spine. The space between the bones of the spine. This narrowing puts pressure on the spinal cord and nerves and can cause pain.

Reactive Arthritis

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/reactive-arthritis

What is reactive arthritis? Reactive arthritis is pain or swelling in a joint that is caused by an infection in your body. You may also have red, swollen eyes and a swollen urinary tract. These symptoms may occur alone, together, or not at all. Most people with reactive arthritis recover fully from the first flare of symptoms and can return to regular activities 2 to 6 months later. Some people will have long-term, mild arthritis. A few patients will have long-term, severe arthritis that is difficult to control with treatment and may cause joint damage.

Acne

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/acne

What is acne? Acne is a disorder that affects the skin’s oil glands and hair follicles. The small holes in your skin (pores) connect to oil glands under the skin. These glands make an oily substance called sebum. The pores connect to the glands by a canal called a follicle. Inside the follicles, oil carries dead skin cells to the surface of the skin. A thin hair also grows through the follicle and out to the skin. Sometimes, the hair, sebum, and skin cells clump together into a plug. The bacteria in the plug cause swelling. Then when the plug